How to Make Pumpkin Purée

How to make Pumpkin Purée

Sooooo, you want to Pumpkin All The Things but you took a pledge to ban the cans? I got you covered. And really, it’s simple. Turning a pumpkin into a pumpkin flavored treat is really easy, just takes a bit of time. But you can totally do this, and your unprocessed life will soon be filled with pumpkin scones, pumpkin pie, pumpkin cookies, pumpkin soup, and pumpkin toothpaste (oh wait…).

First, lets talk about the pumpkins. What pumpkins can be used? Can you make pie out of those Jack-O-Lantern pumpkins you buy your kids at the grocery store? What is a pie pumpkin?

You can eat any variety of pumpkin; all are squash and all are edible but not all pumpkins are grown to be eaten, so the variety you use will affect your results. (Be careful not confuse pumpkins with gourds – those are not edible.)

Jack-O-Lantern pumpkins have been bred for decades for qualities that have nothing to do with taste. Although still technically edible, the flavors are not taken into account when breeding. Jack-O-Lantern pumpkins are now bred for thick skin that can hold up to carving, as well as a heartiness to survive after being carved, and set outside with a candle stuck in its guts. Look for a pie pumpkin, most commonly called a Sugar Pie Pumpkin. They’re small, about the size of a cantaloupe. If you’re confused, jut ask your grocer.

Let’s get started!

1. Preheat oven to 375° F.

2. Remove the stem by running a butter knife around the edges and then prying it off.

How to make Pumpkin Purée

3. Cut the pumpkin in half, right through the hole left by the stem.

How to make Pumpkin Purée

4. Scoop the seeds out with a spoon.

[Andrew adds: Don’t toss those pumpkin seeds! Although it’s a rather slimy process, if you separate out the seeds, you can roast them in the oven for a fantastic Fall snack. Here’s a good tutorial on how to do it.]

How to make Pumpkin Purée

5. Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil. Place pumpkins on baking sheets, cover tightly with aluminum foil. Roast at 375° for 1 to 1 1/2 hours, or until a fork can easily slide into the skin.

How to make Pumpkin Purée

6. Allow to cool and scoop the flesh out.

How to make Pumpkin Purée

7. Add to a food processor and purée until smooth.

8. Store in an air-tight container. Pumpkin purée also freezes well.

How to make Pumpkin Purée
5 from 2 votes
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Pumpkin Purée

Although you technically can use a "jack-o-lantern" pumpkin, it won't taste nearly as good. Best to use a pie pumpkin, also called a Sugar Pie Pumpkin.

Course Prep
Cuisine American
Keyword pumpkin, pumpkin purée
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour 30 minutes
Total Time 2 hours
Yield 4 cups
Calories 88 kcal
Author Jackie Dodd

Ingredients

  • 1 sugar pie pumpkin

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 375° F.

  2. Remove the stem by running a butter knife around the edges and then prying it off.

  3. Cut the pumpkin in half, right through the hole left by the stem.

  4. Scoop the seeds out with a spoon.

  5. Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil. Place pumpkins on baking sheets, cover tightly with aluminum foil. Roast at 375° for 1 to 1 1/2 hours, or until a fork can easily slide into the skin.

  6. Allow to cool and scoop the flesh out.

  7.  Add to a food processor and purée until smooth.

  8. Store in an air-tight container in the refrigerator. Pumpkin purée also freezes well.

About the Author

The Craft Beer Bites CookbookJackie Dodd’s beer-infused recipes earned her a spot as a finalist for Saveur Magazines Best Original Recipes, 2014 as well as crowned winner for Best Beer Coverage in 2015 (yes, craft beer is unprocessed). The Beeroness was also a finalist for Better Homes and Gardens Best Food Blogs, 2015. She has been seen on The Today Show, Lifetime Network, CBS News, as well as interviewed in print publications such as Imbibe, Bite and The San Francisco Chronicle. She also writes for Parade Magazine, Draft Magazine and Whisk Magazine. Jackie is the author of The Craft Beer Cookbook and The Craft Beer Bites Cookbook, and you can connect with her on TwitterFacebook, and Pinterest.

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31 Comments
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selina
October 19, 2018 9:26 am

5 stars
As a Nutritionist i can say this food is 100% healthy and nutritious. Thanks so much for sharing this recipe, I will must try to home.

Jill Roberts @ WellnessGeeky
December 21, 2017 3:59 am

Definitely your pumpkin puree are awesomeness! I prefer pumpkin – it may reduce cancer risk, protect the skin, boost your mood and other. This is a great recipe Jackie, as you know I made it a short while ago and it was lovely, in fact have made it again since. Thanks for sharing!

Diana
Diana
October 2, 2014 5:27 pm

If a sugar pie pumpkin yields about 2c of pumpkin puree, how much fresh pumpkin is needed to make a pie? I used to get the large cans of Libby’s pumpkin and it would make 2 9″ deep dish pies plus a little extra that I would just bake in a small casserole dish. Also, what is a good substitute for canned evaporated milk?

Sondra
Sondra
October 2, 2014 1:35 pm

How long does it last when storing it?

Lisa
Lisa
September 19, 2014 9:08 pm

I absolutely LOVE making my own pumpkin puree. Unfortunately, the stores always sell out of them before I get a chance to buy them. So this year I tried planting my own, and successfully ended up with three pie pumpkins and I am so excited because I actually grew them myself! Anyway, I was going to say that I find that it takes a lot of muscle to scoop out the seeds before cooking it, not to mention a bent up spoon. So I prefer to cut the pumpkin in half and cook it just the way it is, and then the insides scoop out way way easier after it has been cooked. And I do save the seeds for yummy roasted snacks.

Brighid
Brighid
October 1, 2014 12:33 pm
Reply to  Lisa

A sturdy ice cream scoop did the trick for me recently when scooping seeds.